Grand Theft Auto V GPU performance guide

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grand-theft-auto-v-performance-guide

Are you playing GTA V with everything on medium (except for textures) because you not really sure about which settings wouldn’t affect the FPT too much? want to know how to GTA 5 tweak your graphical settings? ok, let go!

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Introduction

This guide will explain to you each graphical feature performance impact, hopefully it will help you in tweaking your game graphics.

Compared to Grand Theft Auto IV, Grand Theft Auto V has been greatly optimized and some low-end computers can run this game on 25fps which is incredible.

Display settings

Screen Type
Some people say that if you set it to ‘Windowed Borderless’ you get more FPS, I had no FPS changes between Fullscreen or Borderless.

If the screen type is set to borderless it will use the monitor set refresh rate.

Resolution
The higher the resolution, the more work your graphics card needs to do.

Refresh Rate
Refresh rate is the number of times in a second that a display hardware updates its buffer. Which means that if you got a 120hz monitor and you get more than 120 frames per second, you’ll see 120 frames per second. Just set it to the highest refresh rate, works only in Fullscreen.

Anti-Aliasing
Anti-aliasing in computer graphics is a technique used to reduce the jagged graphics that makes things look less real-life like and more smooth, there are many different types of anti-aliasing.

FXAA
FXAA is a fast but inaccurate anti-alising and not that effective. It has some impact on performance and doesn’t seem to take any VRAM at all.

MSAA
MSAA is one of the best anti-aliasing techniques but it’s very perfomance heavy depends on your graphics card.

X2 – Takes somewhere around 150mb of VRAM.
X4 – Takes around 400mb of VRAM.
X8 – Takes around 600 ~ 700mb of VRAM, you can’t use Nvidia TXAA if MSAA is set to x8.

TXAA (For Nvidia GPUs only)
TXAA anti-aliasing creates a smoother, clearer image than any other anti-aliasing solution by combining high-quality MSAA multisample anti-aliasing, post processes, and NVIDIA-designed temporal filters.

It doesn’t take any VRAM and doesn’t have any serious performance impact

Vertical Sync
With Vsync turned on, it will synchronize the frame rate of the game with the monitor refresh rate for better stability. If Vsync is turned off, you get a higher frame rate but may experience tearing and artifacts.

Some players are reporting that turning VSync on prevents framerate drops when driving.

Population and Distance

Population Density
The amount of people you will see in the streets, it doesn’t have any performance impact, and doesn’t take any VRAM.

Population Variety
Variety of models, faces and clothes in the population, no performance impact but does take a great amount of VRAM if set to max.

Distance Scaling
The draw distance. Doesn’t have any performance impact, and doesn’t take VRAM.

Game Quality

Texture Quality
High – Takes around ~700MBs of VRAM and has a big performance impact.
Very High – Takes around ~800MBs of VRAM and has a big performance impact.

Shader Quality
High – Takes around ~15MBs of VRAM and has a medium performance impact.
Very High – Takes around ~15MBs of VRAM and has a medium performance impact.

Shadow Quality
High – Takes around 100MBs of VRAM and has a medium performance impact.
Very High – Takes around 200MBs of VRAM and has a big performance impact.

Reflection Quality
High – Takes around ~3MBs of VRAM and doesn’t seem to affect performance that much.
Very High – Takes around ~15MBs of VRAM and has a medium performance impact.
Ultra – Takes around ~55MBs of VRAM and has a big performance impact.

Reflection MSAA
Adds multisample anti-aliasing for reflections and has the same performance impact as normal MSAA impacts your GPU.
X2 – Takes around ~20MBs of VRAM.
X4 – Takes around ~60MBs of VRAM.
X8 – Takes around ~70MBs of VRAM.

Water Quality
High and Very High both take ~8MBs of VRAM and has a low performance impact.

Particles Quality
High – Doesn’t take any VRAM and has a medium performance impact.
Very High – Doesn’t take any VRAM and has a big performance impact.

Grass Quality
Grass has a huge performance impact, it can wreck your framerate on places where there is a lot of grass.

Anisotropic Filtering
Doesn’t take any VRAM and has a low-medium performance impact.

Ambient Occlusion
High – Takes around ~3MBs of VRAM and has a medium performance impact.

Tessellation
High – Doesn’t take any VRAM and has a medium performance impact.
Very High – Doesn’t take any VRAM and has a big performance impact.

Shadows & Post FX

Any soft shadow settings takes around ~5MBs of VRAM besides Sharp, AMD CHS and Nvidia PCSS. From my experiment it doesn’t seem to have any significant impact on the performance and I don’t see any difference between Soft, Softer and Softest or AMD CHS and Nvidia PCSS.

Post FX is the image effects like Bloom, and filter effects.

High takes around ~5MBs of VRAM and has a low performance impact.
Very High takes around ~45MBs of VRAM and has a medium performance impact.
Ultra takes around ~45MBs of VRAM and has a medium performance impact.

AMD CHS vs Nvidia PCSS

DirectX 11-powered NVIDIA Percentage Closer Soft Shadows (PCSS) adds contact-hardening, realistic soft shadows to the game. As in real life, PCSS shadows progressively soften as the distance from the casting object increases, increasing realism. A secondary benefit of PCSS is the inclusion of high-quality shadow filtering techniques that reduce the prominence of shadow aliasing (jagged lines on the edges of shadows).

AMD CHS is a Direct3D 11/ Shader Model 5.0 accelerated technique that uses non-stationary/dynamic weight matrices for unique per-sample filter weights (these don’t necessarily represent a separable filter) for a contact hardening shadow effect. The effect is comparable to PCSS (Percentage-Closer Soft Shadows) but does not suffer from banding or noise artifacts.
DirectX 10 vs DirectX 10.1

DirectX 10 vs DirectX 10.1

In general the difference between DirectX 10 and DirectX 10.1 is that DirectX 10.1 has a few more image quality standards, gives more control over image quality. It also adds support for cube map arrays, separate blend modes per-MRT, coverage mask export from a pixel shader, ability to run pixel shader per sample, access to multi-sampled depth buffers and requires that the video card supports Shader Model 4.1 or higher and 32-bit floating-point operations. Direct3D 10.1 still fully supports Direct3D 10 hardware.

In DirectX 10 you can’t use MSAA, Reflection MSAA, change the Grass Quality, in-game depth of field effects, tessellation or AMD CHS and Nvidia PCSS shadow settings.

While DirectX 10.1 has MSAA and Reflection MSAA you still can’t change the Grass Quality, in-game depth of field effects, tessellation or AMD CHS and Nvidia PCSS shadow settings.

DirectX 10.1 vs DirectX 11

DirectX11 has tessellation support and improved multi-threading support to assist video game developers in developing games that better utilize multi-core processors. DirectX 11 runs on Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8.

Credit: Dennis Stanistan

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